Education in Post-Colonial Tanzania

dc.contributor.advisorGould, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Seth
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-18T19:40:53Z
dc.date.available2022-08-18T19:40:53Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines public education in post-colonial Tanzania, primarily from the period of 1964-1985, when Julius Nyerere lead the country as its president. I examine the post-colonial, socialist ideology that served as the guide for post-colonial state building. In the education system specifically, I examine the "community schools" that were developed in accordance with the Arusha Declaration, which codified Ujamaa as the unifying ideology of the new nation state, and intended to build socialism through agricultural modernization. This paper argues that there were significant problems with the community schools that hindered the completion of goals outlined by the Arusha Declaration. Namely, the continued usage of British examination systems, the national curriculum that was used, and the national-local conflicts that occurred in educational administration. I do this by analyzing Nyerere's personal writings, workforce composition of the time period, and a case study of a prototype community school in the Kwamsisi region prior to national adoption of the structure.
dc.description.sponsorshipHaverford College. Department of Sociology
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10066/24615
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleEducation in Post-Colonial Tanzania
dc.title.alternativeEducation in Tanzania
dc.typeThesis
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