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Happiness helps, but how? : does interhemispheric communication mediate the impact of positive affect on cognitive flexibility?

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dc.contributor.advisor Compton, Rebecca J. (Rebecca Jean)
dc.contributor.author Fleisher, Carl A.
dc.date.accessioned 2007-02-28T20:31:45Z
dc.date.available 2007-02-28T20:31:45Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/753
dc.description.abstract Numerous studies have demonstrated that positive affect has beneficial effects on cognition, mainly due to more efficient and flexible processing of information. Yet, the neural mechanism of these effects has not been thoroughly investigated. We compared the performance of subjects on tasks of cognitive flexibility and interhemispheric communication based on a manipulation of either positive or neutral affect. However, the predicted main effect of affect condition was not observed. Multiple regression analysis indicated that, instead of interhemispheric communication mediating the influence of positive affect, positive affect and interhemispheric communication made independent contributions to increasing cognitive flexibility. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of existing research.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Psychology
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
dc.subject.lcsh Cerebral hemispheres
dc.subject.lcsh Affect (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcsh Cognition
dc.title Happiness helps, but how? : does interhemispheric communication mediate the impact of positive affect on cognitive flexibility?
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Open Access


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/

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