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The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in American Cinema and Culture

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dc.contributor.advisor Dorsey, Bruce
dc.contributor.advisor Azfar, Farid
dc.contributor.author Hackeling, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-03T17:14:45Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-03T17:14:45Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/23728
dc.description.abstract This paper traces the emergence and progression of cultural representations of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the United States from 1976-1988, as well as their impact on the present day. Due to the ambiguities left behind by the Vietnam War, American cinema became both a coping and exploratory vehicle for the population in the years that followed. Artistic and allegorical at first, the medium quickly shifted to commercially and patriotically driven with the election of President Reagan in 1981. As a result, this history was ostensibly rewritten. However, today, society has matured to a degree where it can look back on these times and better discern where certain inaccuracies might lie. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Dept. of History en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Full copyright to this work is retained by the student author. It may only be used for non-commercial, research, and educational purposes. All other uses are restricted.
dc.title The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in American Cinema and Culture en_US
dc.rights.access No restrictions en_US


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