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When nouns become verbs: Hungarian as a case study to classify verbalizers

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dc.contributor.advisor Lillehaugen, Brook Danielle, 1976-
dc.contributor.author Hungar, Brett
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-15T17:48:56Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-15T17:48:56Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/23706
dc.description.abstract There are three sources of meaning for denominal verbs: the noun it is derived from, the context in which it is produced, and the verbalizer used to form it. Much existing research on the meaning of denominal verbs focuses on the noun as the primary source of meaning. In this thesis, I focus on the role of the verbalizer by describing a test to determine how much information the verbalizer contributes and performing this test on seven different verbalizers in Hungarian. I conclude that many of these verbalizers contribute just as much information as the noun, showing a need to consider the role of verbalizers more carefully in not only Hungarian but also other languages.
dc.description.sponsorship Tri-College (Bryn Mawr, Haverford, and Swarthmore Colleges). Department of Linguistics
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.title When nouns become verbs: Hungarian as a case study to classify verbalizers
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Tri-College users only


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