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Beauty Thesis: How Skin Tone and Beauty Rankings Interact in Labor Market Outcomes

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dc.contributor.advisor Preston, Anne Elizabeth
dc.contributor.author Queen, Isabel
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-12T12:44:10Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-12T12:44:10Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/23568
dc.description.abstract This paper looks at the effects of beauty and skin tone on income using data from the General Social Survey. Beauty premiums and skin tone penalties exist and have a significant impact on labor market outcomes. More beautiful people make more money, and darker skin-toned people make less money. Black men show the largest beauty premium. This research suggests that the effect of looks on income becomes even greater as skin tone is darker. White respondents show a skin tone penalty for both males and females. Industry and service jobs show significant beauty premiums, and the service industry shows a skin tone penalty. This research suggests that grooming is more significant than looks in determining income in all groups except black men.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Economics
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject.lcsh Beauty, Personal -- Economic aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Human skin color -- Economic aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Income
dc.title Beauty Thesis: How Skin Tone and Beauty Rankings Interact in Labor Market Outcomes
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Open Access


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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