Institutional Scholarship

Impotence and Indifference: Class Identity, Political Participation, and Unaffiliated Citizens

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dc.contributor.advisor Laurison, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Lam, Angus
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-16T17:52:23Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-16T17:52:23Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/22954
dc.description.abstract According to the latest Gallup poll, over forty percent of Americans identify as “Independent” (Gallup, 2019) — that is, as belonging to neither the Democratic nor Republican Party. Yet, in this era of “extreme political polarization” (Klar, et al, 2019), pundits and academics have largely focused on how partisan identity has become increasingly important to the formation of political attitudes. Democrats and Republicans can’t seem to agree on anything — from fundamental values to government policy to the performance of party leaders. Academics in particular have pointed out that so-called “Independents” aren’t immune to this hyper-partisanship: while a sizable chunk of the eligible voting population doesn’t identify with either party, many concede that they “lean” towards one of the two major parties (Keith et. al, 1992). en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Dept. of Sociology & Anthropology en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Full copyright to this work is retained by the student author. It may only be used for non-commercial, research, and educational purposes. All other uses are restricted.
dc.title Impotence and Indifference: Class Identity, Political Participation, and Unaffiliated Citizens en_US
dc.rights.access No restrictions en_US


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