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Everything but the carbon sink: Cessation of N enrichment allows for rapid recovery of carbon cycling processes in a New England salt marsh

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dc.contributor.advisor Mozdzer, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.author Drew, Sophia E.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-02T23:35:02Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-02T23:35:02Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/21823
dc.description.abstract Salt marshes provide critical ecosystem services, including storm protection, water filtration, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration. Nutrient pollution poses a major threat to these ecosystems as runoff from agricultural fields and wastewater systems delivers high loads of nitrogen and other nutrients. Several studies have shown that N enrichment alters carbon cycling processes in salt marshes, but there has been little work done to determine the capacity for recovery with reduction of N loading. Here we found that ecosystem respiration and decomposition processes returned to reference levels one year after cessation of nitrate addition in a chronically enriched Massachusetts salt marsh. Our results suggest that land management practices that reduce N loading in coastal systems may allow for rapid recovery of carbon cycling processes in enriched marshes.
dc.description.sponsorship Bryn Mawr College. Department of Biology
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject.lcsh Salt marsh restoration
dc.subject.lcsh Nutrient pollution of water -- Massachusetts
dc.title Everything but the carbon sink: Cessation of N enrichment allows for rapid recovery of carbon cycling processes in a New England salt marsh
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Dark Archive


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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