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Baby, I Can See Your Halo : How the Halo Effect, Loss Aversion, and Strategic Attribute Disclosure Neglect Can Inform Negative Advertising

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dc.contributor.advisor Owens, David M.
dc.contributor.author Sultan, Madison
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-01T21:48:17Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-01T21:48:17Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/21733
dc.description.abstract This paper analyzes how the halo effect, loss aversion, and neglect of the strategic nature of information revelation are present in consumer’s sequential learning and belief updating about the quality of products. The implications of these biases are analyzed to determine the circumstances under which producers will optimally engage in negative advertising. A theoretical model is developed and tested using an experiment conducted on Prolific Academic using data from Consumer Reports.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Economics
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject.lcsh Consumers' preferences -- Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Advertising
dc.title Baby, I Can See Your Halo : How the Halo Effect, Loss Aversion, and Strategic Attribute Disclosure Neglect Can Inform Negative Advertising
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Open Access


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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