Institutional Scholarship

Choice, Traits, and Leadership: The Effect of Decision-Making Strategy on Effective Leadership Qualities

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Owens, David M.
dc.contributor.author Moskovitz, Josh
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-01T21:48:17Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-01T21:48:17Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/21730
dc.description.abstract When making a decision that involves information acquisition, people can be defined along a spectrum of maximizing and satisficing decision making behavior. This thesis aims to predict effective leadership qualities from an individual’s propensity for maximizer/satisficer behavior. Using an experimental methodology, participants were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk and completed a delegation game, dictator game, ultimatum game, and honesty game. Maximizer/satisficer decision making strategy was assessed through an adaptation of the Schwartz et al. (2002) scale. Results indicate that a greater propensity to maximize predicts a greater preference for control, which could pose problems when delegating tasks is necessary. However, maximizing behavior is found to be unrelated to altruistic preferences, fairness preferences, and honest behavior. This thesis has implications across leadership roles, ranging from athletics to corporate managers.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Economics
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject.lcsh Decision making
dc.subject.lcsh Leadership
dc.title Choice, Traits, and Leadership: The Effect of Decision-Making Strategy on Effective Leadership Qualities
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Open Access


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Search


Browse

My Account