Music and Meaning in Three Zapotec Songs

Date
2018
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Producer
Director
Performer
Choreographer
Costume Designer
Music
Videographer
Lighting Designer
Set Designer
Crew Member
Funder
Rehearsal Director
Concert Coordinator
Moderator
Panelist
Alternative Title
Department
Haverford College. Department of Music
Type
Thesis
Original Format
Running Time
File Format
Place of Publication
Date Span
Copyright Date
Award
Language
eng
Note
Table of Contents
Terms of Use
Rights Holder
Access Restrictions
Open Access
Tripod URL
Identifier
Abstract
This study explores different types of meaning in three songs by Gario Ángeles in the popular music genre in Teotitlán del Valle Zapotec, an endangered indigenous language spoken in Oaxaca, Mexico. I examine the spoken language’s interaction with melodic and rhythmic patterns in Ángeles’s songs, with a particular focus on how tone is manifested in the vocal melody. I find that the needs of the spoken language are not prioritized, and music and language are equally important, working together to coexist on parallel tracks. I explore the specifics of the songs: how they are organized, how the words and music interact with each other, and how these relationships shape the listener’s understanding of the songs as a whole. Finally, I step back to consider the broader cultural meanings that circulate through these songs. I examine the ways in which Gario Ángeles uses his music as a form of language activism, to valorize the Zapotec language by using universally recognized harmonies, structures, and themes to bridge the gap between local and universal, and with it between tradition and modernity.
Description
Kathryn Goldberg was a Bryn Mawr College student.
Subjects
Citation
Collections