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The Influence of Trade Liberalization on Gender Discrimination in the Workforce

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dc.contributor.advisor Ball, Richard J.
dc.contributor.author Smith, Noelle
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-07T01:13:23Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-07T01:13:23Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/20741
dc.description.abstract This paper seeks to understand the impact of trade liberalization on gender discrimination, a relationship that has not been conclusively ascertained in the current literature. The hypothesis being tested in this paper is based on Becker’s theory (1957) that increasing competition will inherently reduce discrimination. Thus, this paper examines whether this theory holds when applied to trade-induced competition and specifically gender discrimination. In order to capture the influence of trade liberalization on gender discrimination in the workforce, this paper uses various simple linear-log regressions looking at the impact of trade, imports and exports on the gender wage gap as well as female and male employment generally and across various sectors and levels of education. Ultimately, this paper finds that trade tends to diminish gender discrimination in the workforce, but not always.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Economics
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.title The Influence of Trade Liberalization on Gender Discrimination in the Workforce
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Open Access


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