Institutional Scholarship

ISLAND IMAGININGS: INDIVIDUAL PERCEPTIONS WITHIN DUTCH-JAPANESE COOPERATION, 1770-1785

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Smith, Paul J., 1947-
dc.contributor.author Ennis, Tepi Karl
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-18T14:11:20Z
dc.date.available 2019-03-18T14:11:20Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/20593
dc.description.abstract After four hundred years the island of Dejima, in the harbor of Nagasaki, Japan, is a renewed symbol of international cooperation. This thesis summarized the value of Dejima during Japan's "closed country" period, but highlights that history should not be glossed over to create uniformly positive narratives. It is inarguable that Dejima was a transfer point for important goods and influential ideas between Japan and Dutch (and by extension Europe). Yet, the tradesmen and scholars involved were often supremely unhappy with their position and their relationship with the Japanese ranged between friendship and visceral resentment. It is important to acknowledge that international cooperation and development, even among close national “friends,” ha s always been fraught at the microscopic personal level.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of History
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.title ISLAND IMAGININGS: INDIVIDUAL PERCEPTIONS WITHIN DUTCH-JAPANESE COOPERATION, 1770-1785
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Tri-College users only


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Search


Browse

My Account