Institutional Scholarship

Recognizing Oligarchic Structures of Power: A Comparison of the United States and South Korea

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dc.contributor.advisor Allen, Michael H., 1952-
dc.contributor.author Auer, Alexis
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-01T14:45:29Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-01T14:45:29Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/19433
dc.description.abstract In the United States we live under the common misconception that power is equally shared amongst citizens thanks to the democratic system that guides our political processes. In reality, this could not be farther from the truth: power is not equally shared among citizens, but is in fact concentrated among an oligarchic network of corporate executives. By comparing the patterns of power concentration in the United States to a well-known oligarchy, South Korea, I will show how Industrial policy and ideals have effectively enabled these patterns to form.
dc.description.sponsorship Bryn Mawr College. Department of International Studies
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.title Recognizing Oligarchic Structures of Power: A Comparison of the United States and South Korea
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Bi-College users only


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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