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Science, Narrative, and Our Fundamental Comprehension of the World: A Meta-Reflection on the Split in Human Understanding

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dc.contributor.advisor Macbeth, Danielle
dc.contributor.author Schneider, Julian
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-01T13:50:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-01T13:50:16Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/19401
dc.description.abstract My focus is on two very different forms of understanding—what I call scientific understanding and narrative understanding. I argue that scientific understanding is characterized by its non-agential perspective and non-relational notion of time; by removing oneself from the world, one is able to grasp objective truth. Within narrative understanding, on the other hand, one is immersed in the world; this form is essentially agential and adopts a relational notion of time—i.e. time is in relation to the agent who does things in the world. This split in understanding itself can either be understood scientifically or narratively. The scientific picture of the split makes it seem like narrative understanding is a biased and therefore corrupted form of understanding. This picture of the split accords an epistemic priority to science as the enterprise capable of grasping what objectively is. The narrative picture of the split, on the other hand, shows how science is a useful tool for ascertaining certain types of knowledge, but it must be restricted to the domain within which it is useful. I conclude that there is a distinction between narrative understanding and scientific understanding—and furthermore, that narrative understanding contains a distinction between knowing persons and knowing objects, while scientific understanding is only able to know things (even persons) as objects.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Philosophy
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.title Science, Narrative, and Our Fundamental Comprehension of the World: A Meta-Reflection on the Split in Human Understanding
dc.type Thesis en
dc.rights.access Open Access


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