Institutional Scholarship

Slavery and Justice in the Free North: New York's Black Activists, 1831-1841

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dc.contributor.advisor Dorsey, Allison
dc.contributor.author Wallace-Lee, James
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-21T15:13:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-21T15:13:38Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/19212
dc.description.abstract Black activism in 1830s New York was centered around antislavery and abolitionism, and as such was deeply connected to white reform of all forms. Though this connection provided an economic base for black organization, it also fueled racist sentiment among white workers who were increasingly exploited by the transition to wage labor. Though some recent historians and some white reformers in the era embraced a liberal notion of freedom that denied the continued harm of slavery, black reformers understood slavery and capitalism to be intimately connected, and articulated a politics that saw racial and economic exploitation as part of the same emerging system. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Black Studies Prog. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Dept. of English Literature en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Dept. of History en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Full copyright to this work is retained by the student author. It may only be used for non-commercial, research, and educational purposes. All other uses are restricted.
dc.title Slavery and Justice in the Free North: New York's Black Activists, 1831-1841 en_US
dc.type Thesis (B.A.)
dc.rights.access unrestricted en_US
dc.description.note 2017 Paul H. Beik Prize winner en_US


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