Institutional Scholarship

Contagion, Medicine and Disease in the Sixteenth Century: Learned Physicians and the Plague in Vienna

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Graham, Lisa Jane
dc.contributor.advisor Hayton, Darin
dc.contributor.author Storch, Ruth Ariel
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-28T19:17:22Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-28T19:17:22Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/14984
dc.description.abstract In 1521, Vienna experienced a plague outbreak. University-trained physicians, also known as learned physicians, drew on their knowledge from the ancient medical texts, which served as the foundation for the medical curriculum, to produce plague tractates to show their hometowns how to cope with the disease. This thesis will examine the advice in a plague tractate by Georg Tannstetter, a member of the medical faculty at the University of Vienna and personal physician to Emperor Maximilian I, in order to determine sixteenth century learned physicians' views of contagion, disease, and the human body. By analyzing responses to the plague, this thesis will also demonstrate how physicians and towns handled a public health crisis in the sixteenth century. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of History en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
dc.subject.lcsh Physicians -- Austria -- Vienna -- 16th century
dc.subject.lcsh Plague -- Austria -- Vienna -- 16th century
dc.title Contagion, Medicine and Disease in the Sixteenth Century: Learned Physicians and the Plague in Vienna en_US
dc.type Thesis (B.A.) en_US
dc.rights.access Haverford users only


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/

Search


Browse

My Account