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“Some call it Stalking, I call it love”: Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Traits that Predict Unwanted Pursuit and Stalking Behavior After a Romantic Relationship

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dc.contributor.advisor Le, Benjamin
dc.contributor.author Boyd, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-05T16:26:46Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-05T16:26:46Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/11787
dc.description.abstract Previous research has examined potential factors that are predictive of unwanted pursuit behavior (UPB). With goals of determining what types of factors are associated with unwanted pursuit behavior, we studied individual, relational, and demographic characteristics. Data were collected from both college-student and non-student populations to assess possible relationships between the Investment Model (Rusbult et al., 1994), attachment theory (Ainsworth, 1979; Hazan & Shaver, 1987), personality traits (Neuroticism and Narcissism), self-control, and how being a college students influences Total UPB, Mild UPB, Severe UPB, and Facebook UPB. Using the unwanted pursuit behavior inventory provided by Langhinrichsen-Rohling (personal communication, February 10, 2013), UPB was studied as four measures; Total UPB which includes the entire inventory, Mild UPB, which includes inventory items that demonstrate less severe actions that do not involve a threat of physical violence, Severe UPB, which includes only items that represent potential physical or severe psychological threating behavior, and Facebook UPB, which includes only items involving online, social media unwanted pursuit (2013). We found that the pattern of correlations between these predictors and Total UPB and Mild UPB were relatively similar, Severe UPB and Facebook UPB were less consistent in comparison. Narcissism, and tangible investments were the only factors that were significantly correlated with all four UPB measures, though many other factors demonstrated significance in the majority of the UPB measures (including satisfaction, investments, anxious attachment, self-control, and college student demographic). Our results suggest many characteristics must be considered when asking why a person engages in unwanted pursuit behaviors of ranging severity.
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Department of Psychology
dc.language.iso eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
dc.subject.lcsh Stalking -- Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Interpersonal relations -- Psychological aspects
dc.title “Some call it Stalking, I call it love”: Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Traits that Predict Unwanted Pursuit and Stalking Behavior After a Romantic Relationship
dc.type Thesis
dc.rights.access Haverford users only


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