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Terrorism as Order-Word

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dc.contributor.advisor Swingle, Kari
dc.contributor.author Skonieczny, Jason
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-29T17:26:09Z
dc.date.available 2013-07-29T17:26:09Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/11507
dc.description.abstract Terrorism shapes opinions about the events and groups to which the term is applied in the media. In the days after September 11, 2001, terrorism and terrorist attacks were applied overwhelmingly to the events of September 11, 2001. The meaning of terrorism, we will argue, also encompasses a group of people. We will demonstrate in data from September 12 - 15, 2001 from the New York Times, LA Times, and Washington Post the word's ability to signify these two things at once. We will show how the word's semantic peculiarity, which we will call cosignification, is facilitated by a morphological peculiarity. We will also discuss the implications of this semantic ambiguity for the socio-political significance of the term, using Whorf and Deleuze and Guattari. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Swarthmore College. Dept. of Linguistics en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Full copyright to this work is retained by the student author. It may only be used for non-commercial, research, and educational purposes. All other uses are restricted.
dc.title Terrorism as Order-Word en_US
dc.type Thesis (B.A.)


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